In my latest infographic, I created five objectives for a standard from The Ontario Curriculum, which is the currently used curriculum for the Health and Physical Education department at the school I work at.  The standard is…

The Basic Movement: Human Performance: B2.1 describe basic training principles (e.g., specificity, overload, progression, reversibility), and explain how various training methods (e.g., circuit training, cross-training, strength training, fartlek training, interval training) can be used to enhance individual health-related fitness or athletic performance.

The infographic can be found here: Objectives for Standards.

My reasoning for writing this blog is, of course, an assignment… which is: “Write a blog that describes both a performance based, summative assessment and a formative assessment that can be used to measure student learning for the objectives that you wrote for Activity 1.”  So, here goes nothing…


Formative Assessment – Index Card Exit Ticket

I am creating the formative assessment based on ideas from Objective 4 in the infographic linked above, which builds on the previous three objectives and is a perfect lead-in to Objective 5:

By the end of Lesson 4, through an in-class activity, students must be able to apply the various training methods previously learned and evaluate how they are used to enhance individual health-related fitness or athletic performance.

At the end of this lesson, students will have been exposed to the main ideas of: health-related fitness, athletic performance, training principles, and training methods.  After being exposed to various training methods through an in-class activity, students will be asked to work with a partner and take five minutes and reflect on the training methods performed in class.  On one side of a note card, they will write down the training methods that they think are best for health-related fitness.  On the other side, they will write down the training methods that they think are best for athletic performance.  Next to each training method, they will list the training principles that they think were present in each training method.  This will be turned in before each pair of students can leave class.


Performance Based Summative Assessment

I am creating the summative assessment based on ideas from Objective 5 in the infographic linked above, which builds on the previous four objectives:

By the end of this unit, students must understand how to create a training plan for health-related fitness or athletic performance that incorporates both training principles and training methods.

As the objective states, students will be creating a training plan as their performance based summative assessment.  In addition to the standard in the linked infographic, this summative task ties in with an additional standard from The Ontario Curriculum:

The Basic Movement: Human Performance: B2.1 describe basic training principles (e.g., specificity, overload, progression, reversibility), and explain how various training methods (e.g., circuit training, cross-training, strength training, fartlek training, interval training) can be used to enhance individual health-related fitness or athletic performance.

So, this summative assessment actually ties into a couple of standards.  The basic idea is pretty clear in Objective 5 above.  Students will integrate training principles and training methods learned throughout the unit to create a one-year training plan overview that focuses either on health-related fitness or athletic performance.  Depending on what type of training plan is chosen, students will be given examples to base their plans off of.  The idea of the summative is not to break the plan down by day and discuss daily routines, rather the idea is to discuss how and why to properly space the different types of training principles and training methods over the course of a year in order to get the most benefit from training.

As this is the end of the unit, students should be familiar with all of the “buzz words” mentioned above and should not have any problems with designing this training plan.  Students will be given ample class time to complete this assignment so they can bounce any ideas and/or questions off of the teacher as they progress through the training plan design.


Reference

The Ontario Curriculum: Grades 9 to 12 – Health and Physical Education. (2015). Ontario, Canada. The Ontario Public Service. Retrieved April 3, 2017 from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/health9to12.pdf

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