Analysis of Roller Coaster Physics and lesson plan Glog

  • Academic expectations – do you think the teacher holds high performance expectations for students in each of these scenarios? Why or why not?
    • Yes, of course.  She used the “chiming” method to start conversation.  This allows her to get a pulse of students’ understandings of the material.  It also allows students to be in control and be the real problem solvers instead of her simply delivering the content.
    • Additionally, she is good at having students use key vocabulary words in their discussions and work.
    • A computerized model simulation is used for students to test their sketch with expectations that students write down successes and failures that the computer recognizes, then they are mandated to repeat the process.
  • Behavior expectations – do you think behavior expectations are high for students in each scenario? Why or why not?
    • Yes – during the chiming method, students critiqued each other respectfully.
    • The teacher mentions “testing for fun” which tells students to be creating but stay on task.
    • Jobs are assigned to keep students focused: recorder writes down ideas that everyone has; organizer makes sure that everything gets done; accountant manages the budget to purchase materials.  This organizational structure of the students allows each one of them a responsibility and keeps the group on task.
    • A Daily Participation Grade is used to keep students on task and a clear outline is given with consequences for being off task.
  • Norms and Procedures – what are the norms and procedures in these scenarios that support high student performance?
    • In the lesson plan Glog, there is a clear tardy policy that states exactly how many points students will lose based on their amount of minutes tardy to class.
    • Additionally, it is required by the teacher to coordinate with her on the day of return after missed class(es).  A policy on late work is also stated.
    • It is expected of the students that if they wish to use an electronic device, they must first ask permission.  Along with this policy is a link to the Student Handbook and a funny video of what might happen if a student disobeys.
    • A restroom protocol is also listed in the Norms and Procedures section that mandates students to sign in and out and requires them to visit the nurse if they are using the toilet too often.

Analysis of 3rd Grade Chinese Math Class and Explainer: what makes Chinese maths lessons so good?

  • Academic expectations – do you think the teacher holds high performance expectations for students in each of these scenarios? Why or why not?
    • Yes; Teachers ask questions such as “why?”, “how?” and “what if?” to put an emphasis on logical reasoning.
    • Students are expected to understand well enough to prove their maths problems on the board in front of the entire class.
    • By combining in-class and out-of-class work, students easily spend 15 hours per week on maths studies as teachers and parents place a high importance on their students’ maths development for a successful performance on national standardized testing.
  • Behavior expectations – do you think behavior expectations are high for students in each scenario? Why or why not?
    • Yes, the maths system in China is based on longstanding cultural traditions that have proven successful at managing behavior and expectations over the past 2,200+ years.
    • In the video, it is clear that the teacher has clear behavioral expectations – students are quiet when she motions for them to be quiet, they raise their hands to answer a question.  However, she does not do a great job of following through as she often lets students sound out without remark.
  • Norms and Procedures – what are the norms and procedures in these scenarios that support high student performance?
    • Everyone is clearly expected to participate in the rhyming song that the students do in class.
    • Secondary students are expected to follow a mathematical format on maths exams.
    • In the video, students are sitting in an orderly fashion that has clearly been demonstrated and practiced many times.

Analysis of Whole Brain Teaching Richwood High – The Basics

  • Academic expectations – do you think the teacher holds high performance expectations for students in each of these scenarios? Why or why not?
    • Yes; during the students’ one-on-one work, they were clearly on task and were using Kinesthetic movements to display knowledge and help each other better remember the material.
    • The teacher in the video also uses Super Speed Reading.  After further research, I discovered that this is a technique that easily allows students to learn and master 100 of the most common sight words (Biffle, 2009).
  • Behavior expectations – do you think behavior expectations are high for students in each scenario? Why or why not?
    • Yes, students are very focused and engaged.  By using the whole body, students do not have much time to be off task.  They must always be ready to chime in either physically or with their voices when prompted by the teacher.
  • Norms and Procedures – what are the norms and procedures in these scenarios that support high student performance?
    • The teacher went over the rules with the class where she prompted them for each rule and they repeated in unison.  Additionally, she used Kinesthetic movements to help the students easily remember the rules
    • Additionally, when she had the students turn to a particular page in their textbook, students repeated what page in the particular book three times.  This helps with those students who always ask “what page?”

How Can I Apply This?

I plan to implement pieces of each reference below in a  secondary Physical Education elective class down the road.  Hopefully, students will appear in my class with an above average understanding of Physical Education and have the desire to want to learn more.

Personally, I thought that Donna from the Roller Coaster Physics video did a wonderful job of preparing for this lesson and making sure that all of her students were on task.  In my opinion, the learning environment that she created was fun, yet very organized.  By planning the lesson strategically, Donna was able to account for any lack in organization that might be sensed by her 5th graders and found ways to keep them focused on the task at hand.

The 3rd Grade Chinese Math Class video was interesting in a sense that students seemed to be following a system that they had been put in to.  For behavioral and organizational purposes, this is important.  However, besides at the beginning and end of my Physical Education class, I am not sure how I can use these procedural tactics.  I did recognize the effects of reciting things together and the perceived assistance this likely gives to recalling this information during a future class.

Lastly, Whole Brain Teaching is probably the most interesting strategy introduced during this lesson to me.  I have done a bit of research on the effects of Kinesthetic movement in class and the importance of teaching in an unconventional way.  Thankfully, in Physical Education classes, we typically do not have students sit in desks for long periods of time.  However, I feel I can be an ambassador to my school in making sure that others are aware of this effective teaching strategy and the benefits that it provides.

 


 

References

Biffle, C. (2009, March 04). Retrieved February 22, 2017, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DhnCJc63Dc

Chen, C. (2011, June 13). Retrieved February 22, 2017, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7LseF6Db5g

Mace, R. (2016). Roller Coaster Lab [Web log post]. Retrieved February 23, 2017, from http://edu.glogster.com/glog/roller-coaster-lab/1gku0vrn4cn

Mackens, R. (2011, May 31). Retrieved February 22, 2017, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iXTtR7lfWU&feature=youtu.be

Migdol, D. (n.d.). Roller Coaster Physics: STEM in Action. Retrieved February 22, 2017, from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-stem-strategies

Wei, K. (2014, March 25). Explainer: what makes Chinese maths lessons so good? Retrieved February 22, 2017, from http://theconversation.com/explainer-what-makes-chinese-maths-lessons-so-good-24380

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